Eco-Critical Literature: Regreening African Landscapes

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by Ogaga Doherty Abraham Okuyade'12, African Humanities Program Fellow, now available from African Heritage Press.

Critically examines the representations, contructions, and imaginings of the relationship between the human and non-human worlds in contemporary African literature and culture. It offers innovative, incisive, and critical perspectives on the importance of sustaining a symbiotic relationship between humans and their environment. The book thus carries African scholarship beyond the mere analysis of themes and style to ethical and activist roles of literature having an impact on readers the public. It is a scholarship geared toward rectifying ecological imbalance that is prevalent in many parts of the continent that forms the setting, context, and thematic discourse of the works or authors studied in this book. Besides sensitizing the African readership to the need for the restoration of harmony between man and the environment, this book equally aims to further familiarize scholars and students working on African literature and culture with the theoretical concerns of eco-criticism

For more information about the African Humanities Program, click here.

ACLS Fellows release The Tempest for iPad. Elliott Visconsi (University of Notre Dame) and Katherine Rowe (Bryn Mawr) are delighted to announce the public launch of Shakespeare’s The Tempest for iPad.
Download via iTunes:http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/shakespeares-tempest-for-ipad/id516373702?ls=1&mt=8
Much more than a digital book, The Tempest for iPad is aimed at all readers – students, scholars, performers, Shakespeare fans – and is designed for social reading, authoring, and collaboration.
Readers can:
Learn from short expert commentaries provided by the world’s leading Shakespeare scholars, artists and teachers.
Listen to a full-length scrolling audio performance from the noted company Actors From the London Stage. Additional audio takes provide alternative performances of key passages.
Share notes immediately to a Facebook discussion group.
Publish commentaries within the app, and send that content to the iPads of students, friends, or colleagues.
Create a custom play text. Readers choose key passages, annotate them, and share with friends and colleagues worldwide.
Enjoy illustrations, podcasts and videos from The Folger Shakespeare Library’s collection.
Customize the content to suit all backgrounds.
From the classroom to the theater, Luminary’s The Tempest for iPad creates a dynamic and collaborative experience for all readers.
Designed by Visconsi and Rowe to bring a worldwide audience together around Shakespeare’s plays, The Tempest for iPad was developed at the Center for Research Computing at the University of Notre Dame.
More information about Elliott & Katherine, the Luminary project, and our team of experts: www.luminarydigitalmedia.com
Scholarly team includes the following ACLS Fellows Elliott Visconsi, F’04, Harry Berger F’74, Michael Dobson F’92, Marjorie Garber F’89, F’77 (also former ACLS Board member), and Alexander Huang F’10 as well as leading scholars and performers: Katherine Rowe, Brian Cummings, Peter Holland, Jesse Lander, Ellen Mackay, Kristen Poole, Joseph Roach, Lauren Shohet, Brian Walsh, Michael Witmore, Dale Rapley, Jennifer Kidd.
Follow Luminary on Twitter! @luminaryshxpr

ACLS Fellows release The Tempest for iPad. Elliott Visconsi (University of Notre Dame) and Katherine Rowe (Bryn Mawr) are delighted to announce the public launch of Shakespeare’s The Tempest for iPad.

Download via iTunes:
http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/shakespeares-tempest-for-ipad/id516373702?ls=1&mt=8

Much more than a digital book, The Tempest for iPad is aimed at all readers – students, scholars, performers, Shakespeare fans – and is designed for social reading, authoring, and collaboration.

Readers can:

  • Learn from short expert commentaries provided by the world’s leading Shakespeare scholars, artists and teachers.
  • Listen to a full-length scrolling audio performance from the noted company Actors From the London Stage. Additional audio takes provide alternative performances of key passages.
  • Share notes immediately to a Facebook discussion group.
  • Publish commentaries within the app, and send that content to the iPads of students, friends, or colleagues.
  • Create a custom play text. Readers choose key passages, annotate them, and share with friends and colleagues worldwide.
  • Enjoy illustrations, podcasts and videos from The Folger Shakespeare Library’s collection.
  • Customize the content to suit all backgrounds.

From the classroom to the theater, Luminary’s The Tempest for iPad creates a dynamic and collaborative experience for all readers.

Designed by Visconsi and Rowe to bring a worldwide audience together around Shakespeare’s plays, The Tempest for iPad was developed at the Center for Research Computing at the University of Notre Dame.

More information about Elliott & Katherine, the Luminary project, and our team of experts: www.luminarydigitalmedia.com

Scholarly team includes the following ACLS Fellows Elliott Visconsi, F’04, Harry Berger F’74, Michael Dobson F’92, Marjorie Garber F’89, F’77 (also former ACLS Board member), and Alexander Huang F’10 as well as leading scholars and performers: Katherine Rowe, Brian Cummings, Peter Holland, Jesse Lander, Ellen Mackay, Kristen Poole, Joseph Roach, Lauren Shohet, Brian Walsh, Michael Witmore, Dale Rapley, Jennifer Kidd.

Follow Luminary on Twitter! @luminaryshxpr

Colonizer or Colonized: The Hidden Stories of Early Modern French Culture by Sara E. Melzer F’98, F’87 now available from the University of Pennsylvania Press.Colonizer or Colonized introduces two colonial stories into the heart of France’s literary and cultural history. The first describes elite France’s conflicted relationship to the Ancient World. As much as French intellectuals aligned themselves with the Greco-Romans as an “us,” they also resented the Ancients as an imperial “them,” haunted by the memory that both the Greeks and Romans had colonized their ancestors, the Gauls. This memory put the elite on the defensive—defending against the legacy of this colonized past and the fear that they were the barbarian other. The second story mirrored the first. Just as the Romans had colonized the Gauls, France would colonize the New World, becoming the “New Rome” by creating a “New France.” Borrowing the Roman strategy, the French Church and State developed an assimilationist stance towards the Amerindian “barbarian.” This policy provided a foundation for what would become the nation’s most basic stance towards the other. However, this version of assimilation, unlike its subsequent ones, encouraged the colonized and the colonizer to engage in close forms of contact, such as mixed marriages and communities.This book weaves these two different stories together in a triangulated dynamic. It asks the Ancients to step aside to include the New World other into a larger narrative in which elite France carved out their nation’s emerging cultural identity in relation to both the New World and the Ancient World.

Colonizer or Colonized: The Hidden Stories of Early Modern French Culture by Sara E. Melzer F’98, F’87 now available from the University of Pennsylvania Press.

Colonizer or Colonized introduces two colonial stories into the heart of France’s literary and cultural history. The first describes elite France’s conflicted relationship to the Ancient World. As much as French intellectuals aligned themselves with the Greco-Romans as an “us,” they also resented the Ancients as an imperial “them,” haunted by the memory that both the Greeks and Romans had colonized their ancestors, the Gauls. This memory put the elite on the defensive—defending against the legacy of this colonized past and the fear that they were the barbarian other. The second story mirrored the first. Just as the Romans had colonized the Gauls, France would colonize the New World, becoming the “New Rome” by creating a “New France.” Borrowing the Roman strategy, the French Church and State developed an assimilationist stance towards the Amerindian “barbarian.” This policy provided a foundation for what would become the nation’s most basic stance towards the other. However, this version of assimilation, unlike its subsequent ones, encouraged the colonized and the colonizer to engage in close forms of contact, such as mixed marriages and communities.

This book weaves these two different stories together in a triangulated dynamic. It asks the Ancients to step aside to include the New World other into a larger narrative in which elite France carved out their nation’s emerging cultural identity in relation to both the New World and the Ancient World.

[The] study of stories and storytelling can get at the heart of questions concerning how people make sense of—and thereby put themselves in a position to engage with—the circumstances and forces that help shape the course of their lives.
ACLS Fellows Focus on Research: David Herman F’08 on Narrative Worldmaking across Media and Disciplines. http://www.acls.org/news/5-24-11/